Interviewers Go To Social Media

social searchIn the hiring process, there are things employers aren’t permitted to ask, like whether you plan to have kids. Some employers turn to social media to learn more about job candidates.

Many of Don Kluemper’s management students at the University of Illinois at Chicago have had this experience: After going on a job interview, they sometimes receive “friend” requests from their interviewers.

It puts the students in a bind, he says. They fear that not accepting the request might hurt their job chances, but they also feel compelled to scrub their profiles before accepting.

“They didn’t know why they were being friended,” Kluemper says. “If it was some personal request or if the person was going to be screening their profile.”

In a job interview, there are some things that aren’t immediately apparent to the interviewer: a candidate’s religion, marital status or sexual orientation. Employers are not allowed to ask about those things, by law. Many employers check social media profiles of prospective hires online, but doing so is raising questions for both employers and job applicants.

“[The answer to] all of those questions that you shouldn’t ask in a job interview [are] readily available on a social networking website like Facebook,” Kluemper says. “So that creates the problem.”

According to the Society for Human Resource Management, now use social networking to recruit candidates, up from 34 percent six years ago. About a dozen states have banned employers from asking workers for their social media passwords, and Congress is considering several measures that would make that a national policy.

But as far as using information that a job seeker makes publicly available, the rules aren’t exactly clear. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has not issued specific rules governing social media.

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Long-Term Unemployed Make Strong Hires

Long-term unemployedPeople who have been out of work for an extended period, once hired, tend to be just as productive on the job as those with more typical work histories, according to an analysis of almost 20,000 employees.

The research, provided to Bloomberg News by San Francisco-based Evolv Inc., shows no statistically significant difference in measures of job performance between two pools of entry-level call center agents: those who hadn’t held a single full-time job in at least five years before they applied for the position, and the rest. Evolv, which helps large companies assess and manage hourly workers, analyzed data collected from six employers in about 90 locations in the U.S.

The findings buttress President Barack Obama’s call to American businesses to give the long-term unemployed “a fair shot” amid growing evidence that employers have preferred to hire candidates without prolonged jobless spells. Some 3.7 million workers have been out of work for 27 weeks or more as of March, according to Labor Department data released today.

“We have statistical proof that hiring somebody among the long-term unemployed is equal to somebody who is not long-term unemployed,” said Max Simkoff, chief executive officer and co-founder of Evolv.

Evolv tracked four measures of job performance, each collected every day of the worker’s tenure. The variables included the average time it took for the agent to complete a transaction, customer satisfaction ratings, supervisor evaluations, and the percentage of the workday spent at his or her desk.

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Best Cities to Find Jobs

cityscapeSometimes the grass truly is greener on the other side of the fence.  The financial turmoil of the past few years certainly lends credence to that notion, as the Great Recession’s disproportionate impact on local economies spawned a 24-point unemployment rate difference between the most and least bountiful major U.S. cities.

More than 100 million people have moved within the past five years, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, and 48% of unemployed individuals have picked up their roots in search of a job over that timeframe.  This societal mobility stands to be a major asset for job seekers as the economy improves.  In fact, 2014 is expected to be a strong year for hiring, with 27% of employers planning to hire, according to the National Association for Business Economics, and a projected 8% bump in the number of recent college graduates who land jobs, per the National Association for Colleges and Employers.

As an advocate for the health of consumers’ wallets, WalletHub decided to analyze the relative employment opportunities in the 60 largest U.S. cities in order to give people a sense of where on the map the strongest job markets and greatest prospects for long-term financial security can be found.  We did so using 13 unique metrics, ranging from job openings per capita and industry variety to cost of living and the prevalence of employer-provided health benefits.

You can read more about the metrics and underlying data used to conduct this report as well as our ultimate findings below.

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15 Rules for Negotiating a Job Offer

Prof. Deepak Malhotra (Harvard Business School) 15 Rules for Negotiating a Job Offer

Negotiating a job offer is rarely easy. Consider three typical scenarios:

You’re in a third-round interview for a job at a company you like, but a firm you admire even more just invited you in. Suddenly the first hiring manager cuts to the chase: “As you know, we’re considering many candidates. We like you, and we hope the feeling is mutual. If we make you a competitive offer, will you accept it?”

You’ve received an offer for a job you’ll enjoy, but the salary is lower than you think you deserve. You ask your potential boss whether she has any flexibility. “We typically don’t hire people with your background, and we have a different culture here,” she responds. “This job isn’t just about the money. Are you saying you won’t take it unless we increase the pay?”

You’ve been working happily at your company for three years, but a recruiter has been calling, insisting that you could earn much more elsewhere. You don’t want to quit, but you expect to be compensated fairly, so you’d like to ask for a raise. Unfortunately, budgets are tight, and your boss doesn’t react well when people try to leverage outside offers. What do you do?

Each of these situations is difficult in its own way—and emblematic of how complex job negotiations can be.

At many companies, compensation increasingly comes in the form of stock, options, and bonuses linked to both personal and group performance. In MBA recruitment, more companies are using “exploding” offers or sliding-scale signing bonuses based on when a candidate accepts the job, complicating attempts to compare offers. With executive mobility on the rise, people vying for similar positions often have vastly different backgrounds, strengths, and salary histories, making it hard for employers to set benchmarks or create standard packages. Continue reading

Social Recruiting: A Recruiter’s View

Social recruiting is here to stay.  If you have attended any one of my workshops on social media and the job search you already know that, you may or may not believe me.  You may or may not believe that social media is crucial to your job search and it’s understandable.

The landscape has dramatically changed in the past 10 years, what worked then is not working anymore, recruiting is more competitive than ever and recruiters have been under increased pressure to evolved to stay competitive

For a recruiter/hiring manager, competitive means faster and cheaper and the most successful ones have embraced social recruiting.

To understand the importance of social media in the job search you have to understand and be able to leverage your knowledge of social recruiting and there is no better way to understand it than to listen to how recruiters use it

Listen to this local (San Diego) recruiter. Stacy is one of the most connected recruiter and woman on LinkedIn. She is an early social recruiting adopter

Philippe GadeyneCEO Spinnaker Marketing
“Social media from strategy to implementation”

Keeping Your Resume Out of the “No” Pile

The last time you applied for a job and didn’t get an interview, was your resume tossed on the “no” pile after someone skimmed it for only a few seconds, or did the employer read it carefully and you just missed making the cut?

Seventy recruiters met recently at the University of Calgary’s Haskayne School of Business to discuss what can make or break a résumé. The recruiters represented a variety of industries including oil and gas, tourism, technology and financial services, and some of what they revealed may surprise you.

An employer may review 100 or more resumes in an hour, spending only 20-30 seconds on each one. “Recognize that most employers are using the résumé to screen you out rather than to select you in,” says Derek Chapman, Ph.D., professor of industrial organization and psychology at the Haskayne School of Business.

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Interview Dress Code, What To Wear??

Interview dress code… what should you wear?

Preparing for an interview is stressful and hard enough, choosing what to wear should not add to the stress.  A good recruiter will tell you what the proper attire is but what if you are not working through a recruiter?

The proper attire varies widely, from industry to company size to location and even to department.

A young company may have a more casual approach, an  established company tend to the professional look.  These days, the dress code goes from professional all the way to casual but what does that mean?

To help navigate the dress codes, Talener, a staffing agency created the following presentation

Common interview questions

To demonstrate at an interview that you’re the right fit for the role, preparation is vital. Use these common interview questions to prepare succinct, relevant responses; matching your skills and attributes to the needs of the company and role wherever possible. Remember to also prepare a suite of compelling examples to help convince the interviewer that you are the best person for the job. Preparation, positivity and proof are your keys to interview success. Continue reading

5 LinkedIn Alternatives to Consider for Your Networking Strategy

When it comes to social media sites, few platforms are used for their networking juice like LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the undisputed leader in professional social networking. A report by HubSpot showed that it is a whopping 277% more effective than Facebook and Twitter at generating leads.

LinkedIn is a great networking tool, but there are other options out there. This article will give you an idea of what’s available with a look at the top five alternatives. Continue reading